RSVPs: Don’t do that. Do this instead

This article is part of our Don’t do that. Do this instead series.*

R.S.V.Ps

Who doesn’t love a party?RSVPs: Don't do that. Do this instead
I suppose that’s a loaded question because some people don’t actually ‘love a party’. But there the invitation sits: on your mantel, in your inbox, lurking in your voicemail.

So, whether you can’t wait to arrive, and out stay your welcome (that’s a different post), or you want to make a brief appearance and leave early, you need to reply to the invitation.

Neglect to RSVP: DON’T DO THAT
These days the idea of letting your host know that you are (or are not) going to attend an event – an event to which you have been so graciously invited – seems to be something that people think is ‘optional’.

It’s not.

I repeat, not replying is not optional.

Whether it’s a wedding, an office event or a backyard BBQ, if you’ve been invited you MUST reply.

Read moreRSVPs: Don’t do that. Do this instead

LinkedIn: Don’t do that. Do this instead.

This article is part of our Don’t do that. Do this instead series.*

LinkedInLinkedIn: Don't do that. Do this instead.

Six degrees of separation

LinkedIn is a fabulous business tool in so many ways, not least of which its ability to create powerful connections. That’s why it drives me nuts when people initiate those connections in the most anonymous way possible.

Sending the ‘standard’ LinkedIn request: DON’T DO THAT
We’ve all received it, it reads:

Hi Hilary, I’d like to join your LinkedIn network.

And that’s it. No background, no context.

When I receive requests like this, unless I know exactly who that person is, I ignore them, and I know from conversations with others that I’m not alone in this.

Now, I will admit that it is partly to do with the way LinkedIn operates. There are times when you click the ‘Connect’ button and the next thing you know LinkedIn is telling you that the request has been sent. If you are me, you then find yourself yelling ‘Argh!’ at the computer.

So, if you want to really grow your network on LinkedIn in a meaningful way:

DO THIS INSTEAD: Personalize every request
If you want to make sure that people will pay attention to your request, then include a note, every time.

Read moreLinkedIn: Don’t do that. Do this instead.

New Series: Don’t Do That. Do This Instead.

Have you ever had your relationship with a colleague, client or boss change suddenly – and not for the better? Yet you’ve not been able to put your finger on why.

Small actions. Big Impact.
I’ve always maintained that some of the smallest things we do often have the biggest impact on how our professionalism is viewed.  In this new series, “Don’t do that. Do this instead.”, I’m going to help you avoid the tiny (and not so tiny) things that can trip you up and place barriers between you and your success.

Small bites for easy digestion.
Each entry is intended to cover one small piece of a larger topic. However, even though seemingly small, each and every action has a big impact.

Read moreNew Series: Don’t Do That. Do This Instead.

How to Become a Meeting Master

Meetings, meetings everywhere – no time to stop and think.

I once worked in an environment that was made up entirely of meetings: all day, every day. I’m still not exactly sure how I managed to fit in the actual work these meetings generated.Clock Musee d'Orsay

If you work in a company, any size company, eventually someone will ask you not just to attend, but (gasp/horror) to organize a meeting. So, in anticipation of that day, here are the steps to follow to ensure that your meetings stand out in the sea of others – for the right reasons.

1. First and foremost: do you need the meeting? I kid you not, people don’t ask this nearly often enough, and odd though it may seem, not all meetings need to happen. Make sure you know the reason for the meeting: is there a question that needs answering, a project to work on or a problem to be solved? If you have your reason, move to step 2 – if you don’t, go back to your day job (which is, chances are, not organizing meetings).

2. Alright, you have your reason (well done!), now you need to set the agenda. This is another task that seems to stump some. If you can’t come up with any agenda items then your reason for holding the meeting might not be solid – go back to step 1 and double-check. Keep in mind that agendas need to be relevant to the topic at hand, not long for long’s sake…the length of your agenda does not, I repeat, does not, reflect the importance of your meeting.

Read moreHow to Become a Meeting Master

Making Moves

Three years ago today I arrived back in Canada. As with all my continental moves, I had virtually no plan other than getting myself from A to B (you’d never know I DSC_0652organized stuff for a living…).

There have been ups, downs, ‘zeds’ for ‘s’s, crazy-busy jobs, crazy people, travel from coast to coast, humidex heat alerts, ice storms, the chance to see cherished old friends and the opportunity to make fabulous new ones.

The biggest change, though, has been being able to work full-time on developing my company. I’ve wanted to do this since Washington seven years ago and can’t believe I’ve finally got to a point where it’s possible. The germ was planted by Auntie Bubbles (40 years ago!), fostered by Mum and Dad (and Sandra & the Maj), executed by me, and helped along by countless others.

Although I miss Blighty (it’s my heart’s home) and ‘my’ people more than I can say, had I not made this move, in all its undefined-ed-ness, I would not be doing half of what I’ve managed so far. The trade-off of place is worth it; the benefits of new experiences and new friends, beyond measure.

Sitting writing this from my cosy local cafe, where I know the owners and locals alike and where I have made friends, it feels as though there might finally be roots extending into my ‘new’ community.

Three years is a tiny slice of time but it’s been immense to me in many ways. It’s gone by in a flash and I can only imagine what the next three will bring….perhaps an international division of MAJ Communications?

With love to my all my lovely, supportive, funny, crazy, loving and kind people, all over the world, who make living on any continent a true pleasure.

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Seeing etiquette through a different lens (it’s not always about which fork to use)

WindowThere are occasions, when telling people that I provide training on the subject of Etiquette & Protocol, that they look at me like I have an extra head.   Every now and then I can even see their internal dialogue written on their face: ‘that’s so old-fashioned’, ‘she’s clearly living in the past’, ‘oh no, she’s going to critique everything I say and do’.  This last one is the most common; at a recent event the host of my table looked up as I approached and exclaimed, more-or-less in jest, ‘great, I’ve got the etiquette expert!’ (I don’t by the way, unless asked.)

I put these responses down to the fact that many people equate etiquette with ‘rules’ – rules that govern our every move, and get us into trouble if we don’t follow them.

Yes, there are rules when it comes to etiquette and protocol but though they can seem frivolous, they are actually very helpful.  Many stem from common sense and are in place to help us navigate business and social settings; some are driven by interacting with other cultures; others, leftovers of bygone eras, fading into the past.

However, I believe, firmly, that etiquette is so much more than simply a set of rules.  You can take your pick of words and phrases: etiquette, courtesy, civility, polite behaviour, consideration for others – but when it comes down to it, all of these ensure that we carry out our daily interactions – be they business meetings, hosting an event, or passing someone on the street – in a thoughtful, kind manner, which, in turn, shows others that we value their time and attention.

I don’t view the ‘rules’ as being stiff, old-fashioned directives.  I see them, instead, as the tools we use to give us the confidence and freedom to interact with others under any, and all, circumstances.  Sometimes it is about which fork to use – and if you know which fork to use you can ignore your place setting and pay attention to your guests.

And, the great thing about knowing the rules is knowing how, when and where you can break them.

Small but Perfectly Formed

IMG_0117There is an act of kindness and civility so small that it goes practically unnoticed…until it’s not done, and then it can become quite literally a slap in the face – or at the very least a near miss.

‘What is it?’, I hear you ask.  It is this:

When you walk through a door, check behind you.  If there is someone there, or someone approaching, then hold the door open.  Small yet kind.  Simple yet thoughtful.

Looking for an even smaller, easier act of kindness?  If someone does hold the door for you, say thank you.

Interested in sowing the seeds of thoughtful behaviour and good manners? Encourage everyone in your life to embrace this small, but perfectly formed, act of kindness.

How to Help Friends in Grief

I wrote this several years ago (although have little memory of doing so) but because the subject is too often part of our lives, and advice about it is often wanted but not sought out, I thought it was worth re-posting here:IMG_0286

I’ve recently been on the receiving end of condolences and it has caused me to give some thought to the way in which we deal with having friends who are in mourning.

The conclusion of a life is a strange time for all those involved, not just immediate family but friends, acquaintances, work colleagues and even people we see casually or sparingly throughout life – the friendly dry-cleaner, the nice woman at the deli.  No one really knows what to say, what to do or how to act, including the person doing the grieving.

I had this pointed out to me afresh the other day.  Someone I haven’t seen or spoken to since all this happened sent me an instant message saying “how are you? how’s the family?”.

I, in my still slightly foggy state, couldn’t remember when we’d last spoken and couldn’t actually remember if he knew my news. What to do?  It seemed blunt to just come out with it and stupid to beat around the bush so I took a half-way approach and said that I was fine but mourning was a tiring business.  He, because he knew of the underlying situation, understood immediately and sent his condolences but, poor thing, was then completely stymied about what to say next. He felt badly because to his mind he didn’t have the ‘right’ words. He felt like he should say something profound.

Should I call?

Telephone calls can be difficult so unless you are very close to the person grieving stick to writing a note.  Aside from the fact that there are many arrangements that need to be made in the first few weeks (all by telephone) it is also a much more wearisome thing for the person having to say “I’m fine thank you” or “We’re about as you’d expect” and so on.

When they are ready for calls, they will let you know.

Should I write?

I think many people are put off writing letters of condolence because they don’t know what to say.  Somehow they think they need to be profound and have the ‘right’ words, or they think they’ll sound stupid, overly-sentimental or that the person they are writing to won’t want to be reminded of the situation.

I can only speak to my own experience, but I feel sure it’s not unique: it was lovely to get notes, letters and emails; it was lovely to know that the person I loved, respected, admired and missed so much, was loved and missed by others and that friends had me in their thoughts.

If you find yourself in a situation where someone you care about has lost someone they care about, write to them.  They will, eventually, be glad to have it; it may even be passed to other generations – we still have all the letters written to my grandmother after my grandfather died and they give me an insight into someone who exists only on the edges of my memory.

If you think you would struggle with what to say in your letter, card or email (in these cases hand-written is so much nicer, but email works too), here are some places to start – it’s not necessarily easy, but it’s not necessarily meant to be:

If you were well acquainted with the person who died and spent time with them:

  • Include a few of your memories of them, such as: “I remember when we…” or “I still laugh when I think of…”
  • Talk about their character or personality “I always admired the way he…”
  • Don’t be afraid to say that you too will miss them: “I’ll miss the way she brightened up a room”.

If you really only know the person or people left behind simply speak to their sense of loss and/or use things that you know about the person who has died:

  • You can use phrases such as,  “I know you will miss his tenacity and strength of character” or simply, “I know how much you will miss her.”

There are a few things that it’s best to steer clear of, at least for the first while:

  • Talking about it being a release; best for the person who has gone; that they have been relieved of their suffering.  All this may be true but it doesn’t take away from the reality that a much loved person was taken “too soon”, for whatever reason – keeping in mind that too soon can be from 0 to 102 – and that this pill is a bitter one to swallow.
  • Be careful about religious references unless you know the strength and depth of the person’s faith; grieving can test these things, so tread lightly.

What do I say?

Often times running into someone in mourning is the most difficult thing of all. Grief is the elephant in the room. Should you ask them how they are? Give them your condolences? Give them a hug? Tell them it will be get better with time?

The best thing to do is judge the situation carefully – the better you know someone the easier that is. These few tips might help no matter how well you know the person:

  • By all means, give your condolences but keep the encounter short, not ‘rude short’ just not prolonged. There are only so many ways for someone to say they are fine when they don’t mean it.
  • Be careful about asking how they are, sometimes the mere question is enough to provoke upset (usually unexpectedly for all concerned).  You can get around this (if you feel you need to ask the question) by asking about other family members and working your way back to the person in front of you.
  • Hugs are great if you are somewhere out of the way and if you know the person well, otherwise, steer clear.  Someone gave me a hug at the office – quite unexpectedly – and it really threw me.
  • The thing that should be avoided is telling someone things will get better with time. Things will, but no one in that situation believes it and all it means is that they have to summon up the strength to agree with you.

Should I bake a pie, make a casserole, send food?

One of the loveliest things that someone did for us was send a grocery order.  An old and cherished friend went online and ordered all the things we had loved and shared in my parents’ kitchen over the years.  It made us all cry but it also made us laugh as we unpacked and commented on her choices.

Others made food or brought over good coffee or dropped things off on the front porch.  It was all welcome – we certainly weren’t going to be cooking, even eating was touch-and-go; having the food in the fridge ensured that if we were hungry we could eat.

Kindness is the key

As I said at the beginning, the conclusion of a life is a strange time for all those involved.  The key thing to remember is to be kind.

To the person in mourning: Be kind to yourself. Don’t put pressure on yourself to be happy (or sad), to go out or stay home – you get a pass, pretty much, to do what you need to do for yourself.

To the friends, family and others who surround the person grieving: Be kind. Mourning doesn’t finish at a funeral, it merely begins. It is a very strange time and no one ever knows how it will affect them; some days are good, some are less so.  Give the person the space they need, or the company they crave but feel they can’t ask for.  Keep in touch but don’t force; call but don’t bombard.

Make sure they know they are loved and supported and you will be doing your job as a friend.

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